It’s not writer’s block.

I need an outlet and have, for years, blogged extremely infrequently to get my thoughts out there. Just out there, preferably with accidental readers, but okay too if none.

I attributed my failure to establish the blogging habit to  (1) lack of discipline (2) writer’s block. But now I have a third explanation that may help me to move the needle.

On (1). It was a nonsense thought, now I see. There just hasn’t been a solid reason or meaningful incentive for me to blog. Except to get musings out there and over the years Facebook has become my go-to channel.

On (2). My “writer’s block” is very situational. In particular, it only happens when I am actually on WordPress (i.e. the “official” blog place). On Facebook, Twitter, Email, etc., struggles are rare, be it for professional or personal purposes.

Stepping back, I wonder if my self-inflicted pressure of “proper blogging” has been holding me back. Blogging sounds so much more serious than merely posting. Blogging ought to be relatively strategic, with a clear goal and audience. Blogging must be more than a few words; ideally a well-constructed piece with a beginning, a middle, and an end.

My Aha moment?

So here’s to a new mindset, where right here on WordPress, I will write just to tell you something. It may be a sentence, it may be a long tale, it may be a link or a picture. Something du jour.

Afterall, blogging actually comes from the word “Web Logging”. So here I am, just logging along!

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Social Media as a Mirror

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I encourage everyone to develop this habit

  1. Once a fortnight/month, go to your most active Social Media platform, be it Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram
  2. Scroll as if you were someone else (logging out helps).
  3. Ask “Who is this person?”
  4. Ask more “Do I like this person?”

 

Forget Likes or Comments, let’s start with BEING YOU.

 

13 Months of blogging gap!

I don’t write professionally (ha, of course you can tell), nor do I have any followers per se. But once or twice, over the years, some of you kind people responded which made me very happy.

THIRTEEN months had passed between my last and second last post. The timestamps are really a testimony to the fact that lots have happened and that survival/growth/evolution period could only be done  away from writing (in public).

I think I may be ready to blog publicly WHILE managing challenges now. I am at a different stage. Or perhaps, just perhaps, some of you can resonate.

Till next post.

Lemons and Lemonade

“I am making tonnes of lemonade!” I exclaimed during many one-on-one deep work-life conversations with peers.

For me, there’s nothing cliche about this catchphrase, as it captures a significant thread in my life in the past 6 years or so.

Very happy to get to this point, this moment, where I can share what I call my Lemonade Stories.

It’s a bit of a cryptic post – just need to get it out there right now 🙂 Thanks and hope you are having a good day.

Experiment “The Diet Fix”: Important message for those with eating disorder

I enjoyed my experiment on following the Diet Fix. Here’s my last summary.

However, I have learned something very important since then.

So, please, if you have/had eating disorder such as bulimia or binge-eating, read the message below.

eating-disorders-statistics-among-female-students-in-uae

What happened

In my past post, I wrote about my take on The Diet Fix by Yoni Reedhoff after about 10 days of (80%) following his principals.

Soon after that, I experienced a relapse a.k.a binge-ing.

Why this is an important message

I feel the OBLIGATION to warn fellow eating disorder recoverers the lessons I have learned from the experiment. Even if only 1 or 2 people read the post! I have corrected the course – remember it is different for everyone.

Why The Diet Fix was good

The Diet fix encourages:

  • High protein intake per meal (20g for main, 10g for snacks).
  • Preferably 6 meals a day to combat our evolution-based hunger. Meaning, don’t go hungry which will trigger bad food choices.
  • Measure, count (cals, proteins, etc). Repeat.
  • Meet the minimum protein and calories per meal (as opposed to restricting to a maximum).
  • ONLY do what you ENJOY while still keeping to a HEALTHY standard. Indulgences, fluctuations, all healthy and necessary part of life.

I did have good results from following a high protein intake – especially from breakfast through to afternoon. It did prevent mindless unhealthy eating at the end of the day. It also showed my protein intake was previously too low.

Why The Diet Fix for people with eating disorder

Numbers! Counting! Tracking!

Though the approach emphasizes on eating enough protein as opposed to capping at X calories (though that is also softly mentioned), counting is still counting. The danger of totally relying on external validators is that you can easily forget to listen to your body and learn what hunger and fullness feels like.

Intuitive Eating was what helped me, and many others, to stop the vicious cycle of binges.

About 2 weeks into tracking, I did slip back into the old mindset of watching out for the max calories (meeting protein quota was easy).  Quite sure that was the trigger for the subsequent binges.

How to correct the course

  • I set my tracker (myfitnesspal.com) to a ridiculously high calories goal. It takes the red (over calories) marks out of the dashboard.
  • I paid for the premium membership so I can set the macro as the most prominent indicator on my dashboard. Focusing on how I am doing in terms of Protein vs Fat vs Carb, and not calories.
  • Remembering the purpose of tracking – a non-judgemental view of understanding what I put in and how it affects my body.

And I still don’t care about the number on the scale. I care about what how my diet is affecting my health. Hope you are on the same page too.

Good read: Disrupt Yourself

I don’t buy hard copies anymore unless I feel it is a book that I need to hold and read again and again. Kindle, Kobo, and all e-books are generally more economical and portable.

A couple of weeks ago, someone mentioned Disrupt Yourself and, without processing through my usual “book or Kindle” thinking, I impulsively decided to grant that book a space on my bloated bookshelf. A decision I regretted after reading the first 10 pages….BUT THEN……

 

..A decision that was so right now that I am into the final pages!!

The Amazon summary does not do this book justice. So many nuggets – every other sentence really – and deep level of advice that can only be dispensed by a very seasoned professional who had been, really in, the trenches. The anecdotal tales feel raw and genuine, not the typical sugar-coated sell-sy failure-to-success stories so many “gurus” try to spin these days.

 

 

Life Experiments

It took me a long time to realize the purpose of my blog is about life experimentation.

From health to parenting to career, we are doing that all the time.

Perhaps you have read a new approach to “productivity” (hot topic in the startup arena) and you are trying that out.

Perhaps you are checking out a new diet that promised to combat your diabetic problems.

Whatever you are trying to achieve, why not consider yourself a scientist?

HYPOTHESIS

DATA COLLECTION

ANALSIS

CONCLUSION